Posts

The Glenturret adds Cask 100 Peated Drummond Edition to its range

The Glenturret Distillery has announced the hugely-anticipated release of The Glenturret Cask 100 Peated Drummond Edition.

This highly collectable expression, which is available only from the distillery shop, is the first new bottling to be hand signed by the new Distillery Manager Ian Renwick.

The Peated Drummond is a cask strength single malt whisky with hints of dry almonds and fired oak. Priced at £145, and presented in a tweed gift bag, there are only 315 bottles available.

It is inspired by Glenturret’s historical connection with peated whisky when distillery founders John and Hugh Drummond forged an agreement around 1775 with neighbouring Ochtertyre estate to dig peat to fuel the fires to dry their barley for Glenturret.

The Glenturret Cask 100 Peated Drummond Edition is the latest in a series of popular limited edition releases from Scotland’s oldest distillery.

John Laurie, General Manager at The Famous Grouse Experience based at Glenturret Distillery, commented:

“The Glenturret Cask 100 Peated Drummond Edition is another very special, limited edition single cask of the very finest Glenturret malt.

Cask #100 is the first edition to feature 100% fully-peated Ruadh Maor Glenturret at a cask strength of 58.9%. It is a highly collectable single cask dram that’s well worth the price tag.

“Peated Drummond is now available for shop tastings and we plan to introduce it to our Finest Tasting Tray in the coming days.”

TASTING NOTES:

Appearance: Light, golden, clear and bright.
Aroma: Gentle yet pungent peat, slightly medicinal, hint of marzipan, dried oak tree bark.
Taste: Deft balance of flavours, peaty, spicy dry almonds, fired oak.
Finish: Long toasty and dries very slowly to offer further complexity.

To find out more about Glenturret visit: www.theglenturret.com

Please enjoy our whisky responsibly www.drinkaware.co.uk

 

How many stillmen does it take to move the World’s Largest Bottle of Whisky?

Standing a whopping five feet five inches tall and holding a mighty 200 litres (or 8000 drams) of the Famous Grouse, the world’s largest bottle of whisky has taken pride of place at The Famous Grouse Experience at Glenturret Distillery in Crieff since it was officially certified by the Guinness Book of Records in 2012.

The record-breaking bottle has recently moved from the Tasting Lounge to the more accessible Welcome Lounge at Scotland’s most visited and oldest working distillery.

It took the combined efforts of four stillmen, led by new Head of Production Ian Renwick to shift the popular tourist attraction and install it in its new location.

Mandy Ingram, Visitor Experience Manager at The Famous Grouse Experience, said:

“The World’s Largest Bottle has been in our Tasting Lounge for the past five years so we decided to shake things up a bit by moving it to the Welcome Lounge. Our visitors just love taking ‘selfies’ with it and this makes it just that little bit more visible and accessible.”

Ian Renwick, Head of Production at The Famous Grouse Experience, added:

“It was no easy task to move a bottle this size, but it looks fantastic in its new location. I just hope it’s staying put for the next five years!”

The Famous Grouse snatched the world record from Jack Daniels in 2012. The American drinks firm had previously held the title with a 184-litre bottle.

The Famous Grouse bottle was created by expert Czech glass manufactures BOMMA from Svetla, near Prague, and the company became so immersed in the project that they personally drove the bottle 1,200 miles to Scotland in a very carefully packed container.

Once safely delivered to Crieff, it was filled with the equivalent of 8000 drams and the record was certified by the Guinness Book of World Records.

END OF AN ERA: GLENTURRET MANAGER NEIL CAMERON RETIRES AFTER 20 YEARS AT SCOTLAND’S OLDEST DISTILLERY

Glenturret distillery manager Neil Cameron has retired at the end of a 40-year career, to be succeeded in the role by long-time colleague Ian Renwick.

The 2016 Icons of Whisky’s Distillery Manager of the Year bowed out in front of family, friends and colleagues, past and present, at a special event held at the Famous Grouse Experience at Glenturret Distillery on Thursday night (July 27).

Paying tribute to Neil’s long career in the industry was General Manager Stuart Cassells, the driving force behind Glenturret Distillery’s return to the limelight which has included the establishment of the brand’s core range of three malts as well as the series of popular limited-edition releases.

Stuart, who is also leaving Glenturret to take up a new post as Global Brand Development Manager for Glenrothes at Edrington’s Glasgow HQ, said: “Neil has been a tremendous asset to Glenturret over the past two decades, helping us relaunch the brand last year. His loyal service and incredible contribution are second to none and that’s why it was especially fitting when we dedicated our special limited edition Glenturret cask strength single malt whisky – The Glenturret Cameron’s Cut – to him at the end of last year.”

Neil started his career in the whisky industry aged just 15-years-old at the Glenfiddich Distillery in Dufftown in Aberdeenshire.

Over a career that now spans three decades, Neil has amassed a wealth of knowledge and expertise in whisky production that has been accumulated through working at a number of different distilleries, gaining experience of all aspects of whisky production including mashing, distillation and bottling.

By 1990, then a fully trained stillman, and armed with a General Certificate in Distilling, Neil joined Highland Distillers, later part of Edrington. His first role in the company was in the warehouse at Parkmore, Dufftown.

In 1995 he progressed to the role of brewer at Glenturret Distillery and in 1997 he was promoted to his current role of Distillery Manager.

Setting aside Neil’s lifelong passion for Scotland’s most popular alcoholic drink, he is as equally enthusiastic about passing on whisky knowledge and education to the many visitors he meets – including the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in 2015 – and shows around the distillery every year, answering all their questions as he goes.

Asked what he’ll miss most, Neil says: “Definitely the people! I’ve been lucky enough to work with some incredible colleagues during my time in Crieff and it’s been an incredible experience sharing the story of Scotland’s oldest distillery with the tens of thousands of visitors who have made Glenturret Scotland most visited distillery.”

Neil hopes that his legacy will live on in the whiskies he’s helped to create. But what’s his personal favourite?

“I’ve got a soft spot for both the Glenturret Peated Edition and the Glenturret Sherry Edition. Both beautiful drams taken with a small splash of water.”

Retirement will give 60-year-old Neil – who lives in Crieff with wife Moira – time to indulge his passion for hillwalking.

He said: “I’ve bagged the Munros, so I’m now working on ticking off all the Corbetts – I’ve just got three left [on Harris, Knoydart and Rannoch] to go.”

The Famous Grouse Experience lends its expertise to distillery of polar opposites

The Famous Grouse Experience at Glenturret Distillery, Scotland’s oldest working distillery, has forged a partnership with one of the world’s newest distilleries and one that boasts a title of its own as the most northerly distillery in the world.

The Famous Grouse Experience has been giving the team at Norwegian-based distillery Aurora Spirit, located around 350 kilometres north of the arctic circle near the city of Tromso, an insight into how to run a successful whisky visitor attraction and produce small batch whisky on site.

The small Crieff distillery and craft distillers Aurora Spirit, who produce whisky, gin, vodka and aquavit under the name Bivrost®, have been swapping skills, ideas and successes since meeting in early 2015 when Aurora Spirit Directors visited The Famous Grouse Experience on a fact-finding mission.

In a case of old meets new, the two distilleries couldn’t be more different in their distilling process with Glenturret whisky made entirely by hand and Aurora Spirit using the latest technology. However, their passion for small, craft produce and offering visitors a world-class experience are very much the same.

Their partnership has since gone from strength to strength and The Famous Grouse Experience Operations Manager, Lesley Williamson, and Distillery Manager, Neil Cameron, are looking forward to a trip to the arctic-distillers early next year for their official opening.

Lesley Williamson, Operations Manager at The Famous Grouse Experience, visited Tromso in January 2015 on a trip organised as part of the Association of Scottish Visitor Attractions and Aurora Spirit’s key investors. She commented:

“It has been wonderful working with the team from Aurora Spirit and we’re excited to develop this special partnership, continuing to work together to share our skills and passion. Having visited Tromso last year, when the conditions were at some of the toughest, I’ve seen first-hand how different their distillery is to ours and the challenges they face.”

The team at the small Norwegian distillery were impressed with how The Famous Grouse Experience and Glenturret Distillery work as both a working distillery and visitor attraction. Colin Houston, one of the founders of Aurora Spirit, spoke of why his team contacted the top Scottish attraction.

“Having grown up in Oban, the whisky industry has always been close to my heart and I had met with Lesley at The Famous Grouse Experience prior to Aurora Spirit’s founding. When we began, we wanted to gain an insight not only into the whisky making process but also how to incorporate a successful visitor experience centre too. Our distillery is set in the most beautiful location, with magnificent displays of the aurora borealis overhead in the winter and the midnight sun in summer, and we offer visitors a whole host of unique experiences that make the most of our fantastic location.”

AuroraSpirit is situated on a peninsula overlooking Lyngen Fjord on the site of an old underground NATO base that once tracked Russian submarines coming over the top of Norway. The water for their whisky comes from glaciers and their casks are stored in long tunnels drilled into the hillside and underground chambers.

Colin continued:

“We’ve got some of the most advanced technology in our distillery but we want to maintain some traditional aspects of whisky production so it is a sort of fusion, an exciting experimental journey. There’s no more traditional way of making whisky than the way they make it at Glenturret so it really has been a fantastic opportunity for us to come over and share skills with the team there. We can’t wait to welcome Lesley and Neil across to see how Aurora Spirit has progressed since our first meeting.”

The five Glenturret stillmen welcomed head distiller at Aurora Spirit, Gjermund Stensrud, for a week of work experience. As a brewer by trade, he wanted to learn about the traditional craft of whisky distilling and what better place to learn than at a distillery that still makes the whisky by hand.

Neil Cameron, Glenturret Distillery Manager, commented:

“It was wonderful to welcome along Gjermund for a week to show him the ropes of our traditional whisky processes here at Glenturret. Although it is very different in their distillery in Norway, it is important to know the skills and have the knowledge of the techniques which date back to when whisky was first produced. We’re delighted to hear they’ve just produced their first run of whisky and look forward to seeing the outcome in three years’ time.

Neil continued:

“Whilst there’s no computers here at Glenturret and I’m used to the traditional distilling process, I can’t wait to take a trip across to Tromso early next year to see how they make whisky in their beautiful, and quite challenging, surroundings!”

Perthshire cheese with a whisky twist is a hit at farmers’ markets

 

An artisanal Perthshire cheese made with Glenturret whisky has been a hit at farmers’ markets as food and drink lovers get a taste for mixing two home-grown delicacies in one bite.

Strathearn from Strathearn Cheese in Comrie is a rennet set cheese hand washed with a brine that’s flavoured with a 10-year-old Glenturret malt. The brine, along with a four-week maturation process, gives the cheese a hint of a whisky that also prides itself on being hand-made.

The cheese, sold in delicatessens and farm shops, has recently made an appearance at farmers’ markets in Perth, Pitlochry, Aberfeldy and Stirling, coinciding with Scottish Food & Drink Fortnight. The makers of Strathearn now plan to attend the markets regularly to spread the word about their unique pasteurised cheese.

The partners behind the new cheesemaking business, which launched in January, said they stick to local ingredients as much as they can, which made The 10-year-old Glenturret, produced at the nearby Glenturret Distillery in Crieff, a natural choice.

“There aren’t many cheeses made with whisky in Scotland and it was important for us to make something that was very local. The farmers’ markets have all been excellent for us and we can’t wait to spread the word about Strathearn,” said Pierre Leger, co-owner of Strathearn Cheese along with Drew Watson.

Stuart Cassells, General Manager at Glenturret Distllery, said:

“At Glenturret, Scotland’s oldest working distillery, our stillmen still mash ingredients by hand. That’s why we’re delighted that our now 240-year-old brand is appearing in a new hand-made cheese. We are always thrilled when collaborations like this happen and we feel sure Strathearn cheese will be a delicious hit.”

Scottish Food & Drink Fortnight, which ends this Sunday, is a celebration of Scotland’s food and drink products and the people who grow, make, cook and sell it.

For more on The Glenturret visit www.theglenturret.com

For more information about Strathearn Cheese visit www.strathearncheese.co.uk

For more information on Scottish Food & Drink Fortnight visit www.fooddrinkfort.scot/

Second Round for Dram Fine Beer Collaboration

A dram fine beer collaboration between Perthshire-based craft beer maker Inveralmond Brewery and The Glenturret Distillery is enjoying a second round of success after a new batch was released due to popular demand.ooskabeer011

The brewery and the distillery have issued a second batch of Ooskabeer, which sold out just weeks after being launched last November. Ooskabeer blends the distilling skills of The Glenturret Distillery, home to The Famous Grouse Experience in Crieff, with the brewing skills of Inveralmond, located in nearby Perth, to produce a slowly matured beer infused with the delicate aromas and flavours of whisky. Inveralmond provided premium Scotch Ale which was then slowly matured in Glenturret’s whisky barrels.

Ooskabeer Batch #2 has been partly distributed in Switzerland, with the remaining 100 cases available for sale direct to the public by Inveralmond and Glenturret Distillery. After the success of Ooskabeer Batch #1, Inveralmond is encouraging craft beer lovers to get their orders in quickly.

Stuart Cassells, General Manager of Glenturret Distillery commented:

“Ooskabeer is the perfect coming together of two Perthshire companies who live and breathe quality products and heritage. Glenturret provided the casks while Inveralmond Brewery added their brewing expertise and a premium Scotch Ale into the mix. We’re always looking to demonstrate the agility of Glenturret as a small craft producer and Ooskabeer was a great success, having been snapped up by distributors in the UK and Europe. The infusion of malt whisky gives the beer an extra warmth and richness. Such was the demand that we’ve launched Batch #2, which we know is going to be just as popular with whisky fans as with beer fans who have heartily embraced the brew.”

Ooskabeer Batch #2 is available for sale at www.inveralmond-brewery.co.uk and shop.thefamousgrouse.com

To find out more about Glenturret Distillery and their range of hand-made whiskies, visit www.theglenturret.com

To find out more about Inveralmond Brewery and their selection of world class beers, visit www.inveralmond-brewery.co.uk

Please enjoy whisky and beer responsibly www.drinkaware.co.uk

Second round for Inveralmond’s dram fine beer collaboration

A dram fine beer collaboration between Perthshire-based craft beer maker Inveralmond Brewery and The Glenturret Distillery is enjoying a second round of success after a new batch was released due to popular demand.Ooskabeer

The brewery and the distillery have issued a second batch of Ooskabeer, which sold out just weeks after being launched last November. Ooskabeer blends the distilling skills of The Glenturret Distillery, home to The Famous Grouse Experience in Crieff, with the brewing skills of Inveralmond, located in nearby Perth, to produce a slowly matured beer infused with the delicate aromas and flavours of whisky. Inveralmond provided premium Scotch Ale which was then slowly matured in Glenturret’s whisky barrels.

Ooskabeer Batch #2 has been partly distributed in Switzerland, with the remaining 100 cases available for sale direct to the public by Inveralmond and Glenturret Distillery. After the success of Ooskabeer Batch #1, Inveralmond is encouraging craft beer lovers to get their orders in quickly.

Fergus Clark, Managing Director of Inveralmond Brewery, commented:

“Ooskabeer is the perfect coming together of two Perthshire companies who live and breathe great products and heritage. Glenturret provided the casks while we added our brewing expertise and our premium Scotch Ale. We’re always looking to experiment with our beers and this one was a great success, having been snapped up by distributors in the UK and Europe. The infusion of malt whisky gives the beer an extra warmth and richness. Such was the demand that we’ve launched Batch #2, which we know is going to be just as much of a hit.”

Ooskabeer Batch #2 is available for sale at www.inveralmond-brewery.co.uk and shop.thefamousgrouse.com

THE BUTLER DID IT: DISTILLERY’S EXCLUSIVE WHISKY CASK NAMED AFTER GERARD

Scottish actor Gerard Butler is about to be in a different sort of spotlight – as the famous name to adorn the next Bottle Your Own cask at Glenturret, Scotland’s oldest whisky distillery.

FG 90

An exclusive cask of limited edition bottles named after the actor will be available at Glenturret’s Distillery shop, part of Crieff-based The Famous Grouse Experience. The news follows an online poll to identify individuals worthy of the honour, and who have close ties to the area, in which members of the public backed Gerard as a Scot who is “famous for a reason”.

The Bottle Your Own series is hand-picked as an exceptional cask from the Glenturret Distillery by The Famous Grouse Master Blender Kirsteen Campbell. These are extremely collectable and the bottles from these casks are only available from the Glenturret Distillery shop and online on both the UK and global sites.
Gerard follows in the steps of an illustrious line of Bottle Your Own ‘celebrities’ who have ties to the Perthshire area including fellow actor Ewan McGregor, tennis ace Andy Murray and The Earl and Countess of Strathearn. Gerard has close links to Crieff; his mum Margaret and stepdad Alex live in the nearby Perthshire village of Comrie and the Hollywood star is a regular visitor to the area.

The Hollywood-based actor, who was born in Paisley, has said of visiting his mum:

“I sit in the garden, I look up at the mountain ranges and I am just taken aback constantly by how beautiful it is there, and what a great land I come from. I love the humour there and I love the warmth. I just really connect when I get back.”
Stuart Cassells, General Manager at The Famous Grouse Experience, said:

“The Butler did it! Our Bottle Your Own experience has proven to be immensely popular and we’re excited to be continuing the Perthshire connection with Gerard Butler. He may be a teetotaller but he has a great appreciation for his home country. As such he will take his place in Distillery history alongside the other Bottle Your Own ‘celebrities’. Continuing our Bottle Your Own charity efforts, £2 from every bottle sold from the Gerard Butler cask will be donated to a good cause.”

For further information on The Famous Grouse Experience and to book your tour, visit www.thefamousgrouseexperience.com

THE FAMOUS GROUSE EXPERIENCE: A PLACE OF FATHER’S DAY ‘TAILS’ AND INSPIRATION

There’s a reason why Father’s Day is highly celebrated at The Famous Grouse Experience – and it’s not just that it’s an excuse for a dram.

At Scotland’s oldest working distillery in Crieff, Perthshire, tales of fathers and sons abound among the stillmen. Not only are stillmen mashing the whisky ingredients by hand, just like they did hundreds of years ago, but they’re passing on their skills through generations. They’re also the inspiration behind some unique whisky bottlings.

Stillman John Brock worked at Glenturret Distillery at the beginning of last century. His whisky making skills clearly ran in the family. Grandson Charlie, known as Chic, worked at Glenturret as a stillman in the 1980s.

Working alongside Chic was fellow stillman Hugh Malloy. Hugh got the job at the distillery by chance. His father, also called Hugh, was a long-time stillman there. After his death in the early 1980s, son Hugh went to pick up his father’s tools to find that the distillery was understaffed. Hugh was offered a job and ended up working there until he retired in 2007.

Both Hugh and Chic were celebrated last year with a limited edition Glenturret malt whisky named after them, The Brock Malloy Edition #Cask328. One of a series of special edition Glenturret releases, the Brock Malloy sold out within weeks of hitting the shelves.

Meanwhile, Chic’s grandfather John graces the label of the latest special edition malt launched just in time for Father’s Day: The Glenturret Fly’s 16 Masters. The Fly’s 16-year-old bottling was inspired by an old photograph from 1905 that distillery staff unearthed recently in a cupboard. It featured Glenturret’s 16 stillmen, including John, along with the distillery manager’s collie dog, Fly.

The Famous Grouse Experience at The Glenturret Distillery, a must-see for tourists visiting the area, holds the Association of Scottish Visitor Attractions award for 2015 Best Visitor Experience. Its distillery and warehouse tours, nosing and tasting sessions, unique bottle-your-own whiskies and gift shop provide the ultimate whisky experience for fathers and their families.

Stuart Cassells, general manager of The Famous Grouse Experience, said:

“The stillmen formed the backbone of Glenturret Distillery and they still do. The distillery and The Famous Grouse Experience are built on age-old traditions that we celebrate every day with our distillery tours, including the chance to shadow a stillman for a day. It’s inspiring to know that these same traditions and skills were used by more than one generation and in more than one family. And it’s great to think that sons, fathers and grandfathers can continue to enjoy these skills when they visit. This Father’s Day, we think they’ll be tickled by the ‘tail’ behind our Glenturret Fly’s 16 Masters edition.”

 

Scotched on the rock: no hard evidence but theories abound on Glenturret mystery in China

The story surrounding a giant piece of rock in China engraved with the name of a Scotch whisky has gone around the world and back again. Two months on, several leading academics have weighed in with possible explanations.

But, despite the theories, the ‘Scotch on the rock’ mystery remains unsolved.

The story broke after construction workers in China uncovered a rock with the word Glenturret, the name of Scotland’s oldest working distillery. The discovery came during an excavation for a resort at Moganshan, a hilly holiday destination of China two hours from Shanghai. The developers of the resort know some of the property used to belong to Dr. Duncan Main, a Scottish missionary doctor who dedicated 45 years of his life to working in China in the late 1800s and early 1900s. What they were puzzled about was the connection to Glenturret.

Author, historian and China expert Robert Bickers came forward to solve at least part of the story.  The University of Bristol professor uncovered a cutting from a China newspaper story in 1929 which confirms that Dr. Main named his house Glenturret.

Further investigation by Glenturret Distillery has uncovered that Dr. Main worked for a time at a shipyard in Glasgow. Dr Mark McLeister, a lecturer in Chinese Studies at The University of Edinburgh, suggested that there may be a link between his shipyard work and a steamship called Glenturret. The Distillery has learned that the ship was part of the Glen Line fleet owned by McGregor, Gow & Company in Glasgow and served the China tea trade.

Dr McLeister, who worked through archival material and books about Dr Main, added: “There is also a Glenturret Street in Glasgow. Maybe that was somewhere he stayed while working in the city?  The name obviously had significance for him in some way. There is the possibility that he made connections with family members from Glenturret Distillery whilst living in China.”

Another academic fascinated by the story was Dr Christoffer Grundmann, a Professor of Religion and the Healing Arts at Valparaiso University in Indiana, USA. The area around Moganshan grew as a resort and a holiday getaway for foreign missionaries working in Shanghai and Hangchow, where the heat was sweltering in the summer months. Dr Main had planned to open a sanatorium but never did, according to Dr Grundmann. But he did open rest homes for ministers and workers on this particular site. “From the photograph of the rock, it would suggest that this was a marker at an entrance of a property or estate inhabited by Scotsmen during the hot summers. Therefore it may carry significance not just for Dr Main but for one or more of the other Scotsmen living there,” he said.

As the buzz surrounding the story has grown, online commenters have had fun trying to explain away the puzzle.

“I’m going for, the stone formed part of one of the castle turrets. Each turret had a name. This one was Glenturret, there was also a Lochturret, Heatherturret and a Shortbreadturret etc. Depending on the amount of turrets the place had,” said a commenter by the name of ‘DemonEggy’ on Reddit.com.

“Some Chinese businessman chiseled it in so that he could distil whisky and use the same name to try and pass it off as the original??” suggested idonthavearewardcard

Alternative theories have ranged from the stone being an exercise in calligraphy to ancient traders getting a bit tipsy and deciding to chisel the name of their favourite whisky.

Stuart Cassells, General Manager at Glenturret Distillery, commented:

“It’s safe to say that the ‘Scotch on the Rock’ mystery remains a mystery. But, thanks to the efforts of these three talented academics, at least we have some solid theories on how the name Glenturret came to be engraved on a stone almost 5000 miles away.

He added: “The missing link here is a relative of Dr Duncan Main or a resident of one of the rest homes. We’d love for a family member of Dr Main or one of those residents to come forward and shed light on this. In the meantime, cheers to our three experts for spending their valuable time on this fascinating story about a Scotsman in China.”